“I never considered myself discriminated as a roma in Romania. It is only up to you to surpass your circumstances.”

 

 

rudy-moca-new-pictureI am half hungarian and half gypsy, born and raised in Romania. This mix of cultures was never a problem for me. I am ardelean (which is a citizen of the region Transylvania in Romania). This is my identity, I am romanian because of my citizenship and education and I am hungarian/gypsy due to my genes. My country is Romania, I was born and raised here, I love it and I would never move anywhere else. I consider myself a true patriot, sometimes even a bit nationalistic.

Even if I come from this mixed background I never considered myself discriminated in Romania. It is only up to you to surpass your circumstances. I have two bachelor degrees, one in Psychology and the other in Acting. I have an NGO “Romo Sapiens” which is focused on education, more specifically on promoting non formal education through theatre.

Only after the revolution in 1989 did I start reading and doing research on my Roma roots, learned the romani language and so I got more involved with this issue. I consider it to be a complex and varied culture, unique in the word.

I got the chance to travel a lot due to my job as an actor and one of my major achievements was to direct and play in ”A stormy night” in romani language with romani actors, this play being one of the most famous Romanian plays.

One of my dissatisfactions is the fact that up to this moment not that many NGOs managed by roma people have actually managed to obtain funding from the European Union to solve some of the problems within the roma community.

My mission in life can be defined through this sentence: ‘God please offer me the right of not arriving to complacency’.”

 

Copyright: © 2016 | International Organization for Migration, “I am a migrant” campaign

Webpage title: “I never considered myself discriminated as a roma in Romania. It is only up to you to surpass your circumstances.”

Link: http://iamamigrant.org/stories/romania/rudy

Retrieved on: 10/01/2017




Romania is my home without a doubt. But I am also proud to be called a ‘gypsy’.”

 

gruia-bumbu-4

“I was born and raised in Romania and I currently live in Alba Iulia in Romania. I am an active campaigner for human rights, fighting against violence and discrimination towards the Roma community. I am constantly advocating for multi-ethnic co-existence and common understanding. Because of my constant political activity I have been involved in several organizations fighting for Roma rights, having different posititions within these organizations including title of president of Romania IVLP Alumni Association, General Secretary at the International Romani Union and president of Pakiv Romania NGO.

I consider myself to be a European citizen, part of the diverse European family. I am very proud of my roots. Because I was born and raised in Romania, Romania is my country and Romanian is my nationality. I am also gypsy according to my ethnicity. These mix of cultures do not represent a problem for me, I am actually proud of them.

Romania is my home without a doubt and I never considered migrating to a different country. Romani are often discriminated in Romania but we are still citizens of this country. The word ‘gypsy’ does not exist in Romani language so it does not bother me to use it or to be called like this and not romani.

I was the  president of the International Romani Union, Union which was founded in 1971 and it received the status of consulting organization with the United Nations.

I am actively involved in politics and one of my life missions is to fight for the international recognition of Romani. We have many Romani across Europe, we have our own language, we have our flag, our culture and traditions, why not obtain a UN recognition on this matter?”

 

Copyright: © 2016 | International Organization for Migration, “I am a migrant” campaign

Webpage title: “Romania is my home without a doubt. But I am also proud to be called a ‘gypsy’.”

Link: “http://iamamigrant.org/stories/romania/gruia”.

Retrieved on: 10/01/2017

 

 




“I want to go to school and get an education. I want to have a better life.”

 

 

guta-lajos-pictureMy name is Guta and I am a gypsy from Tonciu. Tonciu is a village in Mures County in Romania.

We are many romani here, it is a village only with Roma people.

I don’t have a job as most people who live here do so basically I live out of what the state is giving me which is not that much, I need more money.

I barely went to school so I can’t really read or write.

I would like now to go to school and get an education. I have heard about this program `Second Chance´, where you can get a degree even at a later stage in your life, I want that for myself.

I really don’t understand what discrimination means but when I go to town in Targu Mures and I have to solve a problem there with Romanians I always solve it, so they help me.

If I go to the doctor they help me, if I go to City Hall or anywhere else they help me.

I am proud to be a gypsy as all other gypsies. We are proud people. I am Hungarian but I speak Romanian as well because I live in Romania.

I want more for my people from the Romanian government. I want to have a better life.”

 

Copyright: © 2016 | International Organization for Migration, “I am a migrant” campaign

Webpage title: “I want to go to school and get an education. I want to have a better life.”.

Link: http://iamamigrant.org/stories/romania/guta

Retrieved on: 10/01/2017




One of my life missions is to help integrate the Roma community through education.

 

 

cinca-gheorghe-picture-jpgI live in Batos (Mures County in Transylvania), where I was chosen as a representative of the community in the Local Council and I am also the President of the Roma Democratic Party in the county. I also work as a Romani language teacher in the school of Apalina, a village with  Roma inhabitants only; and I am a certified translator for Romanian, Hungarian and Romani languages.

Romani is an indo-European language similar to sanscrite and the language was recognised by the Indian State. We have a language, an anthem, a flag and now we are also recognised by the Indian Government because Roma people are descendent from India.

Even though my mother was an illiterate she always promoted the importance of education so that you can surpass your condition. I invested constantly in my education this is why I graduated at 51 years old from the University of Bucharest, the Language Faculty (Romani), studying with the biggest expert of Romani language in Romania, professor Gheorge Sariu.

I am a Roma and I am proud to be. I never felt discriminated in Romania and I never wanted to migrate to a different country.

I think what is missing in the Roma community is proper education and the lack of models. What you see is what you follow, so if children see their parents benefiting from the Romanian welfare and refusing to work then why should they go to school?

I also think that the Romanian legislation is innapropiate for Roma people. As an example if you get pregnant at 14 years old which is extremly common in the Roma community, you receive prenatal help, money which actually go to the parents of the new mother because she is a minor. How is this measure helping? This is not preventing them from getting pregnant at early ages but in a way it is actually stimulating the natality among them because the state is giving them money.

The projects for the Roma people are not managed by Roma people because different NGOs which have obtained EU funding do not understand the problems within the Roma community and are not using the funding properly.

I have written two books presenting the Roma culture, its roots, historical evolution and many other interesting facts. I wanted to shed some light regarding the Roma community.  The books are entitled ”The Untouchable from yesterday, the Roma people from Today” and ”Oarba de Mures, bloody land”.

I think that the only way in which you can improve the situation of the Roma community is through education so one of my life missions is to help integrate the Roma community through education.”

 

Copyright: © 2016 | International Organization for Migration, “I am a migrant” campaign

Webpage title: “One of my life missions is to help integrate the Roma community through education”.

Link: http://iamamigrant.org/stories/romania/cinca

Retrieved on: 10/01/2017




Never give up. If you are defeated you rise up and this is how you become a champion. That’s what I teach my Roma students.”

 

lacatus-casian-edited“I am a citizen of Sarmasu, a village located in Mures County, in Romania. I have been living in Sarmasu for the last 30 years but I was born and raised in Lechinta, a village in Bistrita county.

I am a geography teacher, married with two children and I teach here at the school in Sarmasu. I care a lot about the local Roma community and  I was involved in local politics, in the Local Council but I did not really like it so I am no longer politically active.

I like teaching, in my opinion one of the best ways you can stimulate children is through sports. I personally played soccer at a professional level in the second Romanian division when I was younger.  I know how much you can learn and develop through sports; we had organized a national soccer championship at our school for Roma children and our team won. The Roma children really enjoyed this competition.

I am proud of my Roma roots and I never felt discriminated against here in Romania. I got the opportunity to play soccer at a professional level and now I get the chance to teach and impact the lives of so many Roma children.

I never wanted to migrate to a different country for a better life, Romania is home for me, my mother language is Romanian and I also speak Romani.

My mission in life at this stage from a professional perspective is to achieve better results for my Roma community. I want more children to obtain an education here in the village and attend High School and University; to help decrease the percentage of dropouts amoung Romani children; and to motivate them and help them grow.

In addition my suggestions for the municipality are the following (if funding would be available): “School after School” ( A supervisor would take care of the Roma children after school and help them with their assignments); “Second Chance” ( This would be a program meant to help the alumni finish their education, you can take intensive classes and do two years in one); “School for Parents” ( Bringing parents to school to guide them on the importance of obtaining an education, so that they encourage their children to stay in school and obtain an education.)

As a former athlete one of my life mottos is: “Never give up. If you are defeated you rise up and this is how you become a champion.” 

 

Copyright: © 2016 | International Organization for Migration, “I am a migrant” campaign

Webpage title: “Never give up. If you are defeated you rise up and this is how you become a champion. That’s what I teach my Roma students.”.”

Link: http://iamamigrant.org/stories/romania/lacatus

Retrieved on: 10/01/2017




“If I can do something good for my community then I am up for the challenge.”

 

dodo“My name is Dodo Anna and I am a school mediator and Romani teacher in Band, a village located in Mures County, in Romania. As a school mediator I establish the connection between the school and the Roma comunity’s children and their parents, wether they face problems at school or sometimes at home. I am proud to be Roma, even though my first language and mother language is Hungarian, I also speak Romanian due to my studies. In my opinion it is never too late to get an education.

Although I went to school only until 10th grade, I wanted to complete my education and learn more, at 39 years old I went to evening classes to recover some of the missing classes needed in order to obtain the baccalaureate degree. When I applied for University I applied for the 2 vacant seats assigned for Roma representatives and I got in. I studied at Babes Bolyoi University the branch from Targu Mures, faculty of “Educators and Teachers” . As a student among Romanian students I never felt discriminated, I was always treated the same as others by both my colleagues and my teachers, the Romanian state also offered me a scholarship. I was highly appreciated by everyone during my study period.

Romania is my home and Band is my home town, I never thought of migrating to another place. Most of the Romas who go abroad move for a couple of years to work and make savings to come build a house back home, maybe buy a car. They always returned back home, Romas like to stick together and live in their home country which in this case is Romania.

I think that the most important thing in order to solve some of the problems in the Roma community is to improve the education system. Parents should be more involved in the education of their children and encourage them to go to school, teach them the importance of obtaining a degree so that further in their life they can get a job and contribute in the society they live in.

I would like to obtain for my community the following: “School after school”, a program where children are kept in schools after classes and helped with their homework by a supervisor. This project helps them socialize and obtain better results in school; scholarships; jobs; even access to water as you do not have water in all the houses in Roma community from Band. In Band there are three  roma communities, situated in different places in the village.

One of my life motto`s is: “If I can do something good for my community then I am up for the challenge otherwise I prefer not doing anything”.”

 

Copyright: © 2016 | International Organization for Migration, I am a migrant campaign

Webpage title: “If I can do something good for my community then I am up for the challenge.”

Link: http://iamamigrant.org/stories?field_country_of_origin_tid_selective=170&field_current_country_tid_selective=170&field_hashtag_tid_selective=All

Retrieved on: 10/01/2017